Against Ted

By Nathan Jurgenson

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When did TED lose its edge? When did TED stop trying to collect smart people and instead collect people trying to be smart?

Started as a one-off conference nearly 30 years ago, the TED (“Technology, Entertainment and Design”) phenomenon has grown to two large annual events and many smaller regional TEDx events, focusing mostly but not exclusively on technology. TED has posted more than 1,100 videos of the talks online. By my count, 89 of them have achieved more than one million views. Indeed, TED has gained an almost cultish following, where the topics addressed become the water-cooler topics for knowledge workers and the creative class. Remember how the Steve Jobs talk about how to live was topic of conversation the day after he died.

What began as something spontaneous and unique has today become a parody of itself. What was exceptional and emergent in the realm of ideas has been bottled, packaged, and sold back to us over and over again. The whole TED vibe has come to resemble a sales pitch.

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  1. zenbullet reblogged this from thenewinquiry
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  5. stephen-colbert reblogged this from thenewinquiry and added:
    So accurate…
  6. conceptualjoinery reblogged this from thenewinquiry
  7. shwardo said: This essay lacks an ‘edge’ in being against anything. At every chance to stake a personal claim against TED the author quotes another’s twitter, then backs off. Barked from The New Inquiry wagon surely disguises the same snake oil pitch you deride.
  8. dianebluegreen reblogged this from thenewinquiry
  9. amyweber reblogged this from thenewinquiry and added:
    Yea! A way to criticize TED
  10. longlittleness reblogged this from thenewinquiry