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The Rumpus, The Millions, HTMLGIANT, Bomb Magazine, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Gigantic and The New Inquiry presents:
LET’S MAKE A MOVIE
Learn more and RSVP on Facebook
Thursday, November 29th, 8pm
Public Assembly, 70 North 6th Street Brooklyn NY 11211
A Kickstarter party for Happy Baby, the first feature film from The Rumpus

The Rumpus, The Millions, HTMLGIANT, Bomb Magazine, The Los Angeles Review of Books, Gigantic and The New Inquiry presents:

LET’S MAKE A MOVIE

Learn more and RSVP on Facebook

Thursday, November 29th, 8pm

Public Assembly, 70 North 6th Street Brooklyn NY 11211

A Kickstarter party for Happy Baby, the first feature film from The Rumpus

How much of that momentary flush of desire can be left after a maelstrom of toothy smiles and flashing bulbs? I don’t know.

Mike Thomsen, “Sex on Inauguration Night”

Join TNI, Mike, and friends for a reading of this section and more from Levitate at McNally Jackson Books TONIGHT at 7 pm. More info here. Free beer.

Celebrate the release of The New Inquiry Magazine, No. 2: Youth at NYC’s The Kitchen on Tuesday, March 27 for a screening of one of the buried gems of late 60’s youth-power exploitation cinema, “Wild in The Streets.”  
Over four decades before “The 99%,” rock star-turned-President Max Frost told America’s youth they were “The 52%” - a majority that should act like it. In the run up to Occupy Wall Street’s declared May 1 general strike, we’ve assembled a panel to discuss the film, pop music, and revolutionary politics featuring:
Greil Marcus:Legendary rock critic and author of Lipstick Traces, Mystery Train, and most recently, The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years
Sara Marcus: Author of Girls to The Front: The True Story of The Riot Grrrl Revolution
Andrew O’Hehir: Head film critic for Salon.com
Laurie Penny: UK columnist and activist, TNI contributing editor, and author of Meat Market: Female Flesh Under Capitalism and Penny Red
Cosmo Bjorkenheim: New York based controversial-film maker and anthropophobe
Moderated by TNI editor Malcolm Harris.
This event is free and open to the public. Drinks are on us.
RSVP on Facebook

Celebrate the release of The New Inquiry Magazine, No. 2: Youth at NYC’s The Kitchen on Tuesday, March 27 for a screening of one of the buried gems of late 60’s youth-power exploitation cinema, “Wild in The Streets.”  

Over four decades before “The 99%,” rock star-turned-President Max Frost told America’s youth they were “The 52%” - a majority that should act like it. In the run up to Occupy Wall Street’s declared May 1 general strike, we’ve assembled a panel to discuss the film, pop music, and revolutionary politics featuring:

Greil Marcus:Legendary rock critic and author of Lipstick Traces, Mystery Train, and most recently, The Doors: A Lifetime of Listening to Five Mean Years

Sara Marcus: Author of Girls to The Front: The True Story of The Riot Grrrl Revolution

Andrew O’Hehir: Head film critic for Salon.com

Laurie Penny: UK columnist and activist, TNI contributing editor, and author of Meat Market: Female Flesh Under Capitalism and Penny Red

Cosmo Bjorkenheim: New York based controversial-film maker and anthropophobe

Moderated by TNI editor Malcolm Harris.

This event is free and open to the public. Drinks are on us.

RSVP on Facebook

TNI Co-Hosts Lapham’s Live: The Future on Monday, September 19th

Mark your calendars! The New Inquiry is collaborating with Lapham’s Quarterly and Tumblr for a special event on Monday, September 19 at powerHouse Arena in Brooklyn.  

laphamsquarterly:

The Future is coming…and so is our Future launch party, hosted by two venerable instutions: The New Inquiry and Tumblr itself. (We’re honored!)

We’re trying something a little different this time, we want YOU to be a part of the readings. Simply submit a historical reading of less that 500 words about The Future to the LQ Tumblr. If we pick you as one of our favorites, we’ll have you read at the event. If you can’t make it, we’re always happy to reblog your selection. 

SUBMIT now! And pencil in the party, Monday, September 19th @ 7pm, at the powerHouse Arena in Dumbo. 

This experimental event is based on The New Inquiry’s salon, run out of Brazenhead Books. Every week, TNI invites attendees to come prepared with a selected passage to read based on an announced theme. This event format allows us to publish an ongoing series of thematic, crowdsourced archives on Tumblr (such as Un(der)known Writers, and Fringe Feminists), complementing the submissions we receive online through our open invitation form.  

Lapham’s launch party for The Future marks the first-ever public version of this event! Submit your archival selection on “the future” for a chance to be chosen as a featured reader at the live event or have your excerpt published by Lapham’s Quarterly. Who knows? It might even make a cameo on The New Inquiry. 

See you there! 

Sherry Mills unveils her commissioned biographical box art in the latest installment of the groundbreaking mix-media series: PERSPECTIVE.
The event will be co-hosted by The New Inquiry. Join us as we celebrate this momentous occasion.
Read more about Mills’ life and work in Dossier and Idiom.  This is a one night only event. 
Be part of the celebration and RSVP here. 

Sherry Mills unveils her commissioned biographical box art in the latest installment of the groundbreaking mix-media series: PERSPECTIVE.

The event will be co-hosted by The New Inquiry. Join us as we celebrate this momentous occasion.

Read more about Mills’ life and work in Dossier and Idiom.  

This is a one night only event. 

Be part of the celebration and RSVP here

Urban Philosophy (1): The Cruise

1. The Fastest Way to Adventure is to Stand Still

Boredom is an illusion. Boredom is the continuous state of not noticing that the unexpected is constantly arriving while the anticipated is never showing up. Boredom is anti-cruise propaganda. 

- Timothy “Speed” Levitch, Speedology (2002)

* * *

Learn more about TNI’s screening of “The Cruise”

Brooklyn, NY on Sunday, March 13

Subscribe to our newsletter here


Dissent Magazine’s Holiday Party

Thanks to our friends at Dissent Magazine for hosting a lovely holiday party. We submit some scenes from the night: 

The New Inquiry encourages our readers to support the ongoing legacy of this great American intellectual journal by subscribing and/or donating here. 

___

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GOOD EVENING, & GOOD LUCK // Listen closely.
Someone in some movie once said, “Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.” And a German philosopher was again perverted in his words. Weston Rose might nod, thinking sadly of Heidegger’s legacy. Alyssa Martinez would smile impishly and then do a gypsy jig in a circle, maybe quote Nietzsche. The point being: who cares who said what when there’s good music?
Rose and Martinez are the heart and soul behind the Chicago music group Good Evening, gracing New York City Friday, August 6th, at Rockwood Music Hall. I won’t say which is which, who is who: heart, Martinez, soul, Rose. 
Chicago is a city that seems concrete, wedged more or less in the center of the sprawling United States. And so many nicknames: Chi-town, The Windy City, Second City, The Chocolate Bridge (actuallly the last one I made up, and I’m curious to know what others might think this refers to).




Second City is significant in that it seems to denote an overlooked footnote to the supposed first city: New York. But Chicago is far more than a footnote. The natives, or adopted natives, know this and quietly celebrate its culture, history, and urban punch without the aggressive bravado or entitled cynicism characteristic of New Yorkers. 
Good Evening then takes Manhattan and the outer boroughs. So 2010, Martinez sighs. So “wquite [sic],” Rose improvises.
I had the pleasure to engage with these musical magicians through what can only be described as the music journalism model for the 21st-century, born of love and determination, not unlike the music Good Evening gifts us with. Weston Rose and Alyssa Martinez are, for the most part (full interview forthcoming), two sincere musicians—they formed out of a shared love of creating music. When they’re not making music, or before they were making music, their interests involved linguistics, dancing, post-art school traumatic stress disorder, and a dash of indifference to the rules of law school. 
The last paragraph seems so cliché as to deserve an editorial cut. Too bad it’s the truth. Insofar as an effort to pin down musical inspiration wars with the musician’s urge to jettison the cerebral, the logical delineated by words and numbers. I know this is the part where I might type: I sat down with them… cafe… rumpled shirt… batted their eyelashes and ordered an espresso, dark circles under their eyes from a late night rehearsal. Rather unglamorously, Good Evening and TNI had various multimedia explosions on the world wide webernet in the days of May, often past midnight—Skype conversations that included chat overlap, confoundment based on the lack of inflection or facial expression, file sharing (songs, pictures), and a reigning lack of coherence collectively, perhaps the most honest articulation of a musical group’s promise.
Good Evening’s exuberant, almost slap-shod ascent is reflected in their music and collaborative spirit. Martinez and Rose sound out their music through hedging desires to: tap your feet, mesh Ella with a bit of Sinatra, sit and stare at a wall while thinking about how a song makes you want to jump up and live a little, car dance, be social, share. Now, tell me you haven’t felt this way before?
I’ve only ever passed through Chicago on a Greyhound. Didn’t say good evening, didn’t even know where I was. (I was five, OK?) It was the middle of the night and all I could see was the city illuminated by a Minute Maid machine. I then feel it’s okay to romanticize her; it’s okay to romanticize all that you are not, to a point. Romantic is then the top of my Top Five words to describe this music.
Good Evening are Romantics. Even their name suggests a local sincerity, yet the collaborative communion brought to the city they sing good evening to is unpredictable. Unpredictable as that person in the audience listening with a cocked ear, stubbornly starting to sway.
With the release of their album In Public, Good Evening is posed to give a contrary wink to the text overload necessary in promoting musical acts. I sometimes have the suspicion that music journalism comes from the twin impulses to criticize with celebratory writing whilst eschewing absolute silence in the background for a constant stream of melody. I am not a rock journalist, I am a music enthusiast. All hail amateurs!
After all, talking about music might just be like dancing about architecture. It’s sometimes unnecessary (unless you’re Greil Marcus, Noemie LaFrance, or Lester Bangs) but if you’re in New York listen in on Good Evening’s shows. We all just want to shut the laptop sometimes and sway mindlessly to inspired sound.
Good Evening can be found at their home site here, and also on MySpace and Facebook. 

GOOD EVENING, & GOOD LUCK // Listen closely.

Someone in some movie once said, “Talking about music is like dancing about architecture.” And a German philosopher was again perverted in his words. Weston Rose might nod, thinking sadly of Heidegger’s legacy. Alyssa Martinez would smile impishly and then do a gypsy jig in a circle, maybe quote Nietzsche. The point being: who cares who said what when there’s good music?

Rose and Martinez are the heart and soul behind the Chicago music group Good Evening, gracing New York City Friday, August 6th, at Rockwood Music Hall. I won’t say which is which, who is who: heart, Martinez, soul, Rose. 

Chicago is a city that seems concrete, wedged more or less in the center of the sprawling United States. And so many nicknames: Chi-town, The Windy City, Second City, The Chocolate Bridge (actuallly the last one I made up, and I’m curious to know what others might think this refers to).

Second City is significant in that it seems to denote an overlooked footnote to the supposed first city: New York. But Chicago is far more than a footnote. The natives, or adopted natives, know this and quietly celebrate its culture, history, and urban punch without the aggressive bravado or entitled cynicism characteristic of New Yorkers. 

Good Evening then takes Manhattan and the outer boroughs. So 2010, Martinez sighs. So “wquite [sic],” Rose improvises.

I had the pleasure to engage with these musical magicians through what can only be described as the music journalism model for the 21st-century, born of love and determination, not unlike the music Good Evening gifts us with. Weston Rose and Alyssa Martinez are, for the most part (full interview forthcoming), two sincere musicians—they formed out of a shared love of creating music. When they’re not making music, or before they were making music, their interests involved linguistics, dancing, post-art school traumatic stress disorder, and a dash of indifference to the rules of law school. 

The last paragraph seems so cliché as to deserve an editorial cut. Too bad it’s the truth. Insofar as an effort to pin down musical inspiration wars with the musician’s urge to jettison the cerebral, the logical delineated by words and numbers. I know this is the part where I might type: I sat down with them… cafe… rumpled shirt… batted their eyelashes and ordered an espresso, dark circles under their eyes from a late night rehearsal. Rather unglamorously, Good Evening and TNI had various multimedia explosions on the world wide webernet in the days of May, often past midnight—Skype conversations that included chat overlap, confoundment based on the lack of inflection or facial expression, file sharing (songs, pictures), and a reigning lack of coherence collectively, perhaps the most honest articulation of a musical group’s promise.

Good Evening’s exuberant, almost slap-shod ascent is reflected in their music and collaborative spirit. Martinez and Rose sound out their music through hedging desires to: tap your feet, mesh Ella with a bit of Sinatra, sit and stare at a wall while thinking about how a song makes you want to jump up and live a little, car dance, be social, share. Now, tell me you haven’t felt this way before?

I’ve only ever passed through Chicago on a Greyhound. Didn’t say good evening, didn’t even know where I was. (I was five, OK?) It was the middle of the night and all I could see was the city illuminated by a Minute Maid machine. I then feel it’s okay to romanticize her; it’s okay to romanticize all that you are not, to a point. Romantic is then the top of my Top Five words to describe this music.

Good Evening are Romantics. Even their name suggests a local sincerity, yet the collaborative communion brought to the city they sing good evening to is unpredictable. Unpredictable as that person in the audience listening with a cocked ear, stubbornly starting to sway.

With the release of their album In Public, Good Evening is posed to give a contrary wink to the text overload necessary in promoting musical acts. I sometimes have the suspicion that music journalism comes from the twin impulses to criticize with celebratory writing whilst eschewing absolute silence in the background for a constant stream of melody. I am not a rock journalist, I am a music enthusiast. All hail amateurs!

After all, talking about music might just be like dancing about architecture. It’s sometimes unnecessary (unless you’re Greil Marcus, Noemie LaFrance, or Lester Bangs) but if you’re in New York listen in on Good Evening’s shows. We all just want to shut the laptop sometimes and sway mindlessly to inspired sound.

Good Evening can be found at their home site here, and also on MySpace and Facebook